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By: YANG HaicenEdited by: Jemima Badajos

Society

Diverse sailors make splashes at Hong Kong Race Week

The 2024 Hong Kong Race Week drew to a close on Feb.4. The six day event was the second time it was held since the Covid-19 lockdown in 2019. Ten classes of the event including both professional and amateur levels competed in Repulse Bay, Deep Water Bay, Stanley, Tai Tam and Lo Chau. This year’s Hong Kong Race Week was co-organised with the 29er Asian Sailing Championships, attracting 273 local and overseas sailors.   Asia's top ranked sailors, Hangzhou Asian Games medallists and the winners in the last Hong Kong Race Week also gathered at Middle Island to compete. Many junior athletes from Shenzhen, Nanjing and Qingdao  travelled to Hong Kong accompanied by their club coaches or parents to participate in the juniors category, a first for the event.

Society

How Green Roofs Can Encourage a Green City Revolution

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: KURNIAWAN Trista Vania、AO Wei Ying VinciEdited by: Elif Lale AYHAN、Yee Ling TSANG
  • 2024-05-12

As Brisbane aims to become a greener city, the trend of green roofs is gaining momentum. While green roofs offer benefits, they also present challenges that cities must address before implementing new policies. Green roofs are also just one piece of the puzzle. Rather than relying on green roofs as one solution, cities like Hong Kong should view them as catalysts for inspiring more initiatives that pave the way towards a greener future.

Society

AI-powered health and wellness tools: Personalising medical care at your fingertips

With an iPad’s front camera, artificial intelligence and sitting still for just 30 seconds, Vitals, an AI-powered app, can tell your vital signs by simply scanning the colour changes in your face. Vitals was developed by Panoptic.AI, a Hong Kong-based healthtech company founded in August 2022. The health and wellness monitoring app can identify up to 15 health indicators, including your breathing rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation, which can help track current lifestyle conditions and detect any potential health risks down the line. As the colours in your face are affected by blood flow, signals that only show these changes are tracked, which can also filter out “blind spots” such as beards and tattoos. Next, the signals are sent to the company through the cloud, while any personal identifiable information is kept back on the user’s device. Kyle Wong, CEO and co-founder of the start-up, says the product’s idea stems from their previous projects involving temperature screening and thermal imaging technology in large-scale areas, such as border control points and government facilities. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the company’s team realised that it was challenging to identify asymptomatic patients who did not show signs of fever or had taken medication that lowers their temperature, said Wong. “We were doing a lot of research about using a camera, trying to find what other features we can measure from the person,” Wong said. “That led to the idea of what we have now, which is by using a regular camera, and we're talking about the camera of your smartphone, your everyday, off-the-shelf device, we're able to measure these biomarkers,” he said. Artificial intelligence is developing in Hong Kong’s health technology industry as it transforms health and well-being services into a personalised and self-manageable tool.  The rise of artificial intelligence in digital wellness …

Society

Dyeing for Sustainability: Reviving natural indigo for eco-friendly textiles | Global News Relay

Environmentally-conscious artists and experts in the textile industry want to go back to the basics by promoting the use of natural indigo.

Society

Hong Kong kickstarts monthly pyrotechnics on Labour Day

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: AU YEUNG Jim、AO Wei Ying VinciEdited by: Jemima Badajos
  • 2024-05-07

A 10-minute pyrotechnic display lit up the sky of Victoria Harbour on Labour Day. It is the first instalment of the government’s plan to hold pyrotechnics and drone displays every month to better utilise harbourfront resources, boost tourism and stimulate consumption, as explained in this year’s budget address.

Society

Hong Kong tries to give the elderly more care when they face death

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: WANG Jing、YANG ShuyiEdited by: Wai Sum CHEUNG、Ben Rong Li
  • 2024-05-02

Ng Yu-fung’s father was at his deathbed at Nam Long Hospital, a specialist hospital for cancer patients. “What makes me regret is that I was afraid of my father's death when he was near the end of his life,” Ng recalled. His father’s last moments of life inspired him to become a volunteer in hospice care. Today, Ng is president of the Hong Kong Hospice Social Workers Association. The association’s goal is to enhance a patient’s quality of life before the end, focusing on pain management, spiritual care, and palliative care. Hong Kong ranked 20th among 80 countries in the 2023 in quality of death according to a white paper published by the Economist Intelligence Unit. In 2015, Hong Kong ranked 22nd among 40 countries. The Index scores countries across four categories: basic end-of-life healthcare environment; availability are; cost and quality of care. End-of-life care involves palliative care and hospice care, thus the progress of hospice care in Hong Kong contributed greatly to the rise in rankings. Dr. Fowie Ng, vice president of the Hong Kong College of Health Service Executives said that the progress of hospice care in Hong Kong is caused by many factors, including the city’s medical and social services. “The Hospital Authority has set up a ward specifically to treat end-of-life patients. It used to be the responsibility of the Bradbury Hospice Centre, but now it has expanded to many hospitals setting up these ward services on hospice care,” Dr. Ng said. Chan Mok-kwong, president of the Hong Kong Hospice Society said that not only has the government paid more attention to the development of hospice care in recent years, but the support groups who promote education and improve hospice care services have also made a lot of effort. “If the patients have financial difficulties, we …

Society

Rep Your Style: The Enduring Allure of Vintage Fashion

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Jemima Badajos、Sze Kei WONG、Ka Man WongEdited by: Jenny Lam
  • 2024-04-29

Originating from Japan, the ‘vintage clothing’ concept first made its way to Hong Kong around the 1990s and stayed trendy to this day, continuing to be an outlet for the city’s youth to discover different fashion styles and wear their hearts on their sleeves.

Society

Hong Kong beekeepers find ways to battle extreme weather

The mean temperature of Hong Kong has increased nearly 2 degrees Celsius within 10 years.  Given extreme temperatures and frequent typhoons, it is always challenging to nurture bee colonies in Hong Kong.  Still, local beekeepers are determined in continuing what they love and are able to find ways battling against the unpredictable weather.

Society

Getting to know Hong Kong through sustainable ecotourism

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: KIM Seojoon、CHAN Wing YiuEdited by: Elif Lale AYHAN、Wai Sum CHEUNG
  • 2024-04-17

Stepping into the forest, a symphony of bird songs filled the air. Chow Kwok-pun, 57, could practically name every bird in Hong Kong just from their songs.   “The best way to teach people about conservation and creating a sustainable environment is to bring them to nature and feel it with their hearts,” said Chow, a secondary school laboratory technician. Apart from his regular job as a teacher, Chow has been an eco-tour guide for 11 years with a passion for promoting environmental sustainability. Every weekend, he runs bird watching and stargazing tours all over Hong Kong, spanning both rural and urban areas. Ecotourism, according to the International Eco-tourism Society, is “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” Tours, like the ones run by Chow, became popular during the pandemic since many people opted for outdoor activities.  According to the World Tourism Organization, the market value of ecotourism is projected to increase from $219.53 billion in 2023 to $249.16 billion in 2024. The growth, according to UNWTO, is the result of rising demand for authentic experiences, government initiatives and policies, the emergence of responsible travel, and efforts on biodiversity conservation, along with the integration of educational components. On weekends, Chow’s eco-tours start at 8 am at early Tai Po Kau Nature Reserve, a popular spot among naturalists, biologists and locals who crave serenity. The Reserve covers 440 hectares of forest on the steep catchment area of a stream. The forest extends from 50 metres above sea level to the top of Grassy Hill (Tso Shan), at  647 metrest. “It is the best forest left in Hong Kong. You can see the well-grown canopy,” Chow said. “People think that there are no birds and stars in the city, I’m here to prove …

Society

Hong Kong bus companies roll out electric and hydrogen powered buses to meet carbon neutrality goal

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: WANG Ludan、YANG Shuyi、WANG JingEdited by: Sze Kei WONG
  • 2024-03-29

The first hydrogen double-decker buses in Hong Kong set sail in February for the Vodafone Road route. Starting from 2022, the electric buses are appearing on the Hong Kong’s street to reduce emissions more than diesel buses as part of the public transportation sector’s efforts to help Hong Kong achieve its goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.