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The Young Reporter

iPhone 8 battery is safe, local Apple Store claims

  • 2017-10-04
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Maggie Liu、Susan Gao、Melissa KO、Lloyd Hewitt-Robinson、Kenji ChanEdited by: Susan Gao、Melissa KO
  • 2017-10-04

The new iPhone 8 released on September 22, has reportedly had some battery problems. The Apple Daily newspaper reported that a Hong Kong buyer surnamed Lam reported that his gold-coloured iPhone 8 was already bloated when he opened the box even before getting a chance to use the phone. Lam took the faulty device back to the Apple Store where he bought it from, and the store gave him a replacement as it was determined that the device could not be fixed, said Apple Daily. This afternoon, The Young Reporter visited the Shatin store. "iPhone 6s also has had this kind of problem before. We would normally just recall the phone," said its spokesperson, "No need to worry about (iPhone's) safety." Three such known incidents have all taken place in Asia, Japan on September 24, Taiwan on the 26th and Hong Kong on the 28th respectively. Karl Leung Ping-hung, the head of the department of information and communication technology at Vocational Training Council said, "batteries used by current mobile phones and pads usually swell when reaching their lifespans." However, it is still unclear what caused the new iPhone 8 battery to swell up this time. Apple Store said it would investigate the incidents. Kylie Chen, a big fan of Apple product, who plans to buy a new iPhone said the phone bloating incident would not affect his decision. Two more iPhone 8 Plus users have reported problems with their devices. A Taiwanese woman surnamed Wu was the first to report the problem after her gold iPhone 8 Plus burst open whilst charging using an official charging cable, said Taiwan Apple Daily. Wu had the iPhone for three days and began charging when the device has 70% battery and after three minutes it burst open after becoming swollen, Apple Daily said. …

Ink roots deeper than the dermis

  • 2017-10-03

Ink roots deeper than the dermis Hong Kong tattoo convention as a window to the tattoo culture "Tattoos are not only for 'privileged' gang members," said Gabe Shum, founder of the first-ever international tattoo convention in Hong Kong. People from all walks of life get tattoos, he added. Running its fifth year, the Hong Kong China International Tattoo Convention features more than 300 artists from all around the world. Through this event, Shum hopes that more people could get to know the tattoo culture. From September 29 to October 1 in Kai Tak Cruise Terminal, aisles of booths will provide walk-in tattoo services, but for those who are not yet ready for the lifelong commitment, some also display paintings and stickers designed by artists. The three-day event includes tattoo showcases and competitions, a mini-air gun firing range, DJ turntablism sessions and more. The aim of the convention, however, is not profit-ma, king Shum said. He simply wants the event to run smoothly and for Hong Kong artists to leave a lasting impression. He recalled foreign tattoo artists' doubt on Hong Kong and China artists when he went to tattoo conventions in other countries. Enraged by their disdain, he decided to organise the city's own international tattoo convention. Shum hopes that local tattoo artists will develop their own style and stand out in the international radar. One of the highlights for this year is Tebori, the Japanese traditional practice of tattooing by hand. It is being showcased by Japanese tattoo artist, Sousyu Hayashi throughout the whole convention. Hayashi will have completed a 20-hour scalp tattoo by the end of the event, using his hands, needles and hand-grinded Japanese calligraphy ink. This is considered a rare practice performed by only about 20 artists in Japan, said Hayashi, who has been engraving skin …

National day firework draws hundreds of thousands

  • 2017-10-02

As part of the 68th National Day celebrations, 31,888 pyrotechnic shells were fired from five barges in Victoria Harbour in the evening of October 1. The firework, which costs HK$13 million, lasted for 23 minutes. It is the most expensive firework since the city's handover in 1997. Despite the shower, people were seen flocking in until the very beginning of the ceremony at 8pm. Police estimated the number of attendees to 250,000 in Kowloon and 26,000 on the island. Crowd control measures were in place with the closure of numerous roads. The Marine Department issued special notices restricting maritime traffic and urged vessel owners to follow safety guidelines. Dozens of people gathered in Central in memory of the 39 people killed in the collision of two tourist ships bounding for celebration's firework in 2012. The worst maritime disaster in Hong Kong's modern history has prompted the authorities to issue specific guidelines on boats during fireworks. Some families have been demanding justice as the proceedings are ongoing. The flow of people took some time to disperse. Roads were cleared at around 10p.m.   Reported by Raphael Blet Edited by Cecilia Wong

Rally called for an end to 'authoritarian rule' on China's national day

  • 2017-10-02

  Organizers of ‘anti-authoritarian rally' said  40,000 people attended the march on China's 68th National Day. Raised by Demosisto, League of Social Democrats and other political parties, the demonstration kicked off at Victoria Park in Causeway Bay, marching to the Government Headquarters in Tamar. "Step down Yuen Kwok-keung!  Against authoritarian rule! " people called for Justice Secretary Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung to resign during the march. "We are here because we see that the situation is getting worse and worse especially since the new administration took over and began persecution and prosecution," said Griffith Jones, member of Socialist Action. In August,  the Department of Justice successfully appealed to the sentencing of student activists Joshua Wong Chi-fung, Alex Chow Wing-hong and Nathan Law Kwun-chung who were charged for storming the ‘Civic Square' beside the Legco back in 2014. The trio was sentenced between six to eight months behind bars- which pan-democrats regard as a politically motivated sentence. Occupy leaders Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Chan Kin-man and Reverend Chu Yiu-ming all showed up in the demonstration. The three face charges of public nuisance in relation to the Umbrella movement, which brought the city's busiest districts to a halt for almost three months. Several protesters were holding yellow umbrellas, a symbol of the 79-day occupied movement in 2014. "We are here because Hong Kong is in a bad shape, we will continue until we take back our city," said a female protester surnamed Ho. Part of the Pro-independence protesters were waving Catalan flags, in reference to the current referendum on the Spanish region's possible independence. "We do not have (hold) Catalan flags because (of) support(ing) Catalonia's independence. We just want to show the government that other countries discuss independence as well," said one of the demonstrators. Spokesperson for the government responded to the event later, saying …

After Three Years, Sea of Yellow Umbrellas re-appeared in Admiralty

  • 2017-09-28
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Erin Chan、Michael Shum、Daisy LeeEdited by: Isabella Lo
  • 2017-09-28

Convener of Citizen Charter 617 James Hon Lin-shan, also an organiser of the event, said more than a thousand people attended the commemorative rally of Umbrella Movement on Thursday - a double of what he expected. At 5.58pm, participants stood for three minutes of silence with their yellow umbrellas raised.  Steam and sound were used to re-enact the scene at the exact time three years ago, when police started intimidating tear gases to force out the protesters. Around 40 parties and civil groups set up booths in the anniversary event. The three Occupy Central founders -  Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Chan Kin-man and Reverend Chu Yiu-ming were among the speakers on stage. Tai said that people in Hong Kong should keep the faith in fighting for democracy. "No matter how the situation becomes, we should believe that Hong Kong can enjoy true democracy one day, " he said. The associate professor of law at the University of Hong Kong also criticized the government's suppression on discussions over Hong Kong independence. "Tell me why speaking about Hong Kong independence has violated the law? Which law I have actually violated?" Tai added. He also pointed out that the trio are all mentally prepared for the possible imprisonment. 'I believed once we have started the road of civil disobedience, we have to pluck up our courage to walk till the end, including being imprisoned,'' Reverend Chu said. The pro-democracy Umbrella Movement took place in 2014 was aimed to fight for universal suffrage to elect the city's leader and to resist the 831 framework proposed by Beijing. The 831 framework, laid down by the National People's Congress Standing Committee, set limits for 2017 Chief Executive Elections and 2016 Legislative Council in HKSAR, which involves screening of candidates and emphasizes the importance of a patriotic leader. …

Former student leaders exempt from imprisonment over University council siege

  • 2017-09-22
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Erin Chan、Michael ShumEdited by: Tracy Zhang、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-22

Former student leader Billy Fung Jing-en was sentenced to 240 hours of community service on Thursday over the siege of the University of Hong Kong governing council meeting last year. Fung, then president of the University of Hong Kong Student Union, was convicted of acting in a disorderly conduct by forcing his way into the meeting venue and damaging the front door. His then vice-president, Colman Li Fung-kei, 22, was sentenced to 200 hours of community service for obstruction of blocking paramedics from sending council member Leonie Ki Man-fung to hospital, who was injured during the protests. Both men were convicted in July, but only Fung pleaded guilty to the charges of criminal damage and attempted forcible entry. Magistrate Ko Wai-hung stated that even though both were meant to uphold the belief of social justice, using violence to achieve so is unacceptable. "Your identity as university student is not a halo but a spell. People would follow your every move. Your actions may receive mixed reactions. But if you are opinionated, you will wander from righteousness," said Ko. Ko added that he hoped Fung and Li can use legal, non-violence means to give back to the society upon community sentence. Over hundred mitigation letters were presented to court in support of Fung and Li before the court hearing yesterday. Among the letter writers, there are HKU's president Peter Matheison and HKU council member Leonie Ki Man-fung. Ki was blocked by Li on her way to hospital after being shoved and kicked during the tense protests by students demanding a conversation with chairman Arthur Li Kwok-cheung. Ki stated in the letter that she had forgiven Li after meeting him, who had made a sincere apology. Fung reflected on his jail exemption through facebook. "We may be upset or helpless over our …

41-year-old rape suspect refused to answer questions related to the victim

  • 2017-09-21
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Dorothy Ma、Windy LI、Tracy ZhangEdited by: Nicole Kwok
  • 2017-09-21

Hung Ngam-Chung rape case in high courtA 41-year-old local man accused of raping a teenager refused to say whether he knows the victim, as a video showed by the prosecution today.The police officer who interrogated the defendant appeared in court as a witness.The video showed a trial by police in which the defendant said he did not know the blotted towel and refuse to talk about his whatsapp message sent to the victim.The blue towel was allegedly to be put under the 16-year-old teenager during the intercourse when she was in her periodHung Ngam-chung, the defendant, pleaded not guilty to the charge of rape. The next hearing is scheduled tomorrow. Posted by Jade Li on 2017年9月19日 Hung Ngam-Chung, an unemployed 41-year-old man, is accused of raping a 16 year-old woman, X,  last year in Hong Kong. Hearing continues at High Court yesterday. In a police interrogation video played in court, the defendant refused to answer whether he knows X, as well as other questions related to the X. The policeman in the video appeared as witness today in court, said that the defendant moved to Hung Yu Mansion in Sham Shui Po two days after X was raped. The video also showed that when the defendant was asked about a found blood towel, he said he did not recognize it. He also refused to talk about his WhatsApp message sent to the victim. The blood towel was allegedly said to be put under X when she was forced to have sex with the defendant. X tried to tell the defendant she was in her period at that time, but the defendant ignored her, then place the towel under X. It is also known that X just gave birth. The defendant pleaded not guilty to the charge of rape. The next …

Decision was made out of "collective wisdom", the DR Group founder said

  • 2017-09-21
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Wing Li、Elisa LukEdited by: Daniel Ma、Celia Lai、Fred LAI
  • 2017-09-21

The founder of DR Beauty Group should bear full responsibility for the whole incident, says the defence counsel of the group's technician in the hearing on Tuesday morning. Three defendants face charges of manslaughter regarding the death of a 46-year-old woman in 2012.  The clinic head Stephen Chow Heung-wing, Chan Kwun-chung, a technician, and Mak Wan-ling, the patient's physician attended the hearing today. All of them pleaded not guilty. The defence counsel of Chan pointed out that Chow, who was also a doctor of the clinic, should be fully responsible since he was the one who made the decision of adopting CIK, a form of immunotherapy believed to be able to whiten and refine the skin. Chan's defence added that Chow made most of the decisions at the clinic, even the locations of the promotion posters. Chow denied the accusation and said most decisions were made by the whole central managerial team, claiming it was a common practice to make decisions with "collective wisdom". Meanwhile, Chow said he had appointed Chan to be in charge of the CIK treatment program. Chan's defence said Chan's Putonghua is "horrible" so he could not further enquire the supervisor at Guangzhou Military Hospital with the actual amount of cells needed for the treatment when they were learning about the CIK technology at the hospital . However, Chow responded that Li was able to communicate in Cantonese. Chow also could not answer the proper dosage and the frequency of injection when questioned by the judge. The trial continues on 16 Oct. [HCCC437/2015]  

Conspiracy to make explosives hearing resumes as defence suspects insufficient evidence from police

  • 2017-09-21
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Erica Chin、Michael ShumEdited by: Isabella Lo、Cecilia Wong、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-21

The defence council of the five males, accused of secretly making explosives in the abandoned ATV studio suspected the prosecution has brought insufficient evidence to court, heard in High Court on Wednesday. He questioned the sufficiency of evidence provided by the prosecution after cross-examining a CIB police officer who is the second witness. The officer told the court that he has not kept any records in words about their operations, only with his memory and audio reports. The prosecution refused to disclose how the oral report was recorded due to the risk of exposing confidential operation details in a public hearing when enquired by the defence. The defence suspected the police for providing insufficient evidence to the court after the prosecution suggested that a cousin document of the audio reports is available. The defence council doubted if  the two CIB police officers could make a mistake on recognising the defendants. Defendants Chan Yiu-shing, 34, Cheng Wai-shing, 29, Pennelli Rizzy, 21, Wu Kai-fu, 21, Man Ting-lock, 23, was arrested after finding chemicals capable of producing explosives in former ATV premises in Sai Kung as police officers saw "yellowish white flashes" and smoke coming out from the building. The second CIB police officer told the court that they have been briefed by their superior Sgt. Lo Ka-shing of four male and two female as their targets, through the fourth defendant Wu Kai-fu was not one of their targets. "His [Wu's] name was not even known to the police before he was arrested," said the defence council of Wu, who also said it was a "chance encounter" for the police to have Wu arrested. Previous hearings revealed that Man Ting-lock, the fifth defendant, pleaded guilty and admitted that he has joined an anti-government organisation, "National Independence Party". They were experimenting with smoke bombs …

Barrister of Occupy Central founders: charges are over-complicated and overloaded

  • 2017-09-20

The counsel for the three founders of the Occupy Central movement has criticised the prosecution for slapping "over-complicated" charges on them, saying they would have pleaded guilty had they been charged with "unauthorised assembly". Senior Counsel Gerard McCoy said Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Chan Kin-man and Reverend Chu Yiu-ming remained inclined to admit their responsibility had they been charged with the proper offence of unauthorised assembly. Instead, Tai, associate professor of law at the University of Hong Kong, Chan, associate professor of sociology at the Chinese University, and Chu are charged with the three charges : ‘Conspiracy to cause public nuisance', ‘inciting others to cause public nuisance' and ‘inciting people to incite others to cause public nuisance'. McCoy also questioned the court's decision to put them in a bound trial, as the alleged crimes might have happened in different locations. The defence then challenged the case's justifiability, stating  ‘inciting people to incite others to commit public nuisance' was "‘curious and downright strange"'. He also raised that double incitement was unconstitutional by quoting a recent similar Australian case. He urges the court to reconsider if the charges are "lawful and proper". Before the hearing, ousted Legislative Councillor Leung Kwok-hung and other supporters chanted for jailed defendant Wong Ho-ming: "We miss you! Shame on political prosecution!" Prosecution Senior Counsel Leung Cheuk-yin condemned such acts as freedom of expression had its limits and warned that the conduct might be recognised as a criminal contempt. McCoy said such an act was ‘outrageous' and ‘intolerable'. The pre-trial review is scheduled for January 9 to 12 next year. (DCCC480/2017) Reported by Ezra Cheung Edited by Daniel Ma, Isabella Lo, Cecilia Wong and James Ho